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Posts tagged ‘William Shakespeare’

When Shakespeare committed word crimes


Bette A. Stevens:

GUILTY as charged! ~ Bette A. Stevens

Originally posted on ideas.ted.com:

Shakespeare coined new words when he needed — or merely wanted — them. Can you guess which words were invented by the Bard?

English heading into the sixteenth century was a makeshift, cobbled-together thing. No fewer than eight conquering peoples had added to our vocabulary and shaped our syntax. But the Brits were doing more than just borrowing, swiping and outright stealing words from other languages. Versifiers like Chaucer let newfangled words from the street amble onto the literary stage – newfangled and amble being two of them.

By the time Elizabethan dramatists sought expression for ever-more sophisticated sentiments, crowds cheered their linguistic daring.

A short list of verbs invented by the Bard:

arouse
besmirch
bet
drug
dwindle
hoodwink
hurry
puke
rant
swagger

Shakespeare also minted new metaphors, many now cliches, but fresh in his time:

it’s Greek to me
played fast and loose
slept not one wink
seen better days

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Shakespeare’s King Lear on stage in London


Bette A. Stevens:

Shakespeare’s messages never get old… ~Bette A. Stevens

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:

This video from Britain is called King Lear.

By Gordon Parsons in Britain:

Theatre: King Lear

Tuesday 4th February 2014

In its depiction of societal and personal breakdown, a new production of King Lear by Sam Mendes speaks directly and uncomfortably to our own times, says GORDON PARSONS

King Lear

National Theatre, London SE1

4 Stars

More than any other of Shakespeare‘s plays, this great symphonic drama of the human condition has mirrored each successive age, often unbearably, with its own self-image.

Our own nihilistic day, obsessed with media accounts of what seems the dissolution of both civilised society and personal relationships, finds its ugly reflection in Sam Mendes’s eagerly awaited production.

From the opening, when Simon Russell Beale‘s ageing dictator enters his conference chamber walled with his own military imperial guard, we recognise a common scene of power and insecurity.

Ordered to express the degree…

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William Shakespeare today


Bette A. Stevens:

About THE BARD!

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:

This video is called Romeo and Juliet, Audiobook by William Shakespeare

By Bob Rogers in Britain:

Who’s afraid of the big, bad Bard?

Sunday 11 November 2012

In equal measures – measure for measure if you like – I used to fear and loathe Shakespeare.

Fear because of the power his dead hand seemed to wield over otherwise unimpressable teachers and loathing because of the apparently insurmountable gulf between his Early Modern English and my unwillingness to even try and decipher it.

For most 12-year-olds it was probably not a major issue, but I had just moved with my family from the south Wales valleys to Stratford upon Avon.

Worse, I was a pupil in the very school Shakespeare was said to have once attended, so naturally he was a permanent and frequent fixture on the curriculum.

To read his words, sterile and flat on the printed page…

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Shakespeare, Then & Now


Bette A. Stevens:

HIS TIIME & OURS… Shakespeare’s Restless World by Neil MacGregor (Allen Lane, £25)

 

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:

This video is called Video SparkNotes: Shakespeare’s King Lear summary.

Simon Basketter in Britain takes a look at a new book that cuts through the mysticism around Shakespeare:

Tue 16 Oct 2012

Objects that bear witness to Shakespeare’s restless times

The last thing the eyeball of Edward Oldcorne would have seen was the executioner walking to disembowel him.

That eyeball became a relic. And the crowds who watched his execution in the morning could then go to a Shakespeare play in the afternoon.

Neil MacGregor points out in his new book on William Shakespeare, “A stage is actually called a scaffold, and in Henry V the Chorus uses the word.

“So when Shakespeare stages the gouging out of Gloucester’s eyes in King Lear, it is for an audience who would have seen people being disembowelled and the severed heads on London Bridge.”

There is probably more mysticism about Shakespeare…

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