A writer inspired by nature and human nature

Posts tagged ‘Nature’

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Believe in Miracles—poem by Bette A. Stevens


 

Believe in Miracles

Poem by Bette A. Stevens

The whistling of the wind at play
Sunrise marking each new day
Rainfall crafting flowers to grow
Bright hues of every new rainbow

Planning skills for birds and bees
Conifer seeds becoming trees
Seas with creatures great and small
Land or sea, God made them all

Stars that mark the sky at night
Waning moon soon waxing bright
Seasons as they come and go
Wonders in each day they show

Wonder of wonders is mankind
Of every persuasion, you will find
God’s miracles are everywhere
Here to treasure, here to share

God made each one of us to show
His love and mercy as we go
About our life on earth each day
To all God’s wonders on our way

The greatest miracle you’ll find
God made the world with us in mind
He made it so that we might see
The love He has for you and me

John 1:3 (NIV) “Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made.”

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Even after all…


LOVE is what it’s all about… Keep shining! ~Bette A. Stevens, Maine author http://www.4writersandreaders.com

Sacred Touches

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**Images via Pinterest; collage by Natalie

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With freedom…


So very happy! ~Bette A. Stevens, Maine author http://www.4writersandreaders.com

Sacred Touches

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**Signed image via Pinterest

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“Diversity”: Poem by Bette A. Stevens


Diversity

by Bette A. Stevens

Splendor of countless pigments
In gardens they combine
Echoing grandiose harmony
Serenity you’ll find

And so it is with people
Of every thought and hue
Diversity’s resplendency
Reflecting me and you

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Fresh Fallen Crystals —Poem by Bette A. Stevens


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A Season of Wonder

Early December at the Farmstead in Central Maine—finally have a covering of snow and temperatures cold enough to keep the white magic around for a while. Conifer branches adorned in winter’s white called out to this writer: “Capture a photo, we’re all spruced up in our new attire!” from near the barn’s entrance. I simply had to pen their remembrance in a poem—
Fresh Fallen Crystals.

Wishing you all a Season of Wonder!

~ Bette A. Stevens, Maine author

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SENSATIONAL SUMMER: A Monarch Butterfly Poem by Bette A. Stevens


Illustrations for Sensational Summer are from Bette's award-winning children's picure book, AMAZING MATILDA.

Illustrations for the poem “Sensational Summer” are from Bette’s award-winning children’s picture book, AMAZING MATILDA.

Much like a Monarch butterfly, the summer is quickly flying past us here at The Farmstead in Central Maine. In fact, it won’t be long before these amazing butterflies begin their great southern migration to Mexico, where they’ll aggregate (cluster in dense tree cover) to keep warm, enabling this generation of monarchs to winter over before they mate and begin the next generation’s migration north for the 2017 season.  Matilda (a Monarch butterfly and the main character in my picture book AMAZING MATILDA) and I wish you and yours a sensational summer! ~ Bette A. Stevens, Maine author/illustrator 

We invite you to take a look inside AMAZING MATILDA, A Monarch’s Tale and check out other books by Bette A. Stevens

AM HighResolution BW Border

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Milkweed – It’s Not Just for Monarchs


GOT MILKWEED? Monarch butterflies and other amazing pollinators need it and we need them! ~ Bette A. Stevens, Maine author/illustrator http://www.4writersandreaders.com

The Natural Web

One of the most well knownassociations between an animal and plant species is the relationship between Monarch butterflies and Milkweed. Monarch butterflies may certainly be seen nectaringat various species of milkweeds…

Monarch nectaring on Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) Monarch nectaringon Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca)

Monarch nectaring on Butterflyweed (Asclepias tuberosa) Monarch nectaringon Butterflyweed(Asclepias tuberosa)

Monarch nectaring on Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) Monarch nectaringon Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)

but this isn’t unique – they also drink at a wide variety of other flower species.

Monarch nectaring on New York Ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis) Monarch nectaringon New York Ironweed(Vernonianoveboracensis)

It’s the dependency that Monarchs have on Milkweedsas the only food source for their caterpillars that makes this relationship so noteworthy. Monarchs, like many species of insects, have evolved to specialize in their larval (in this case caterpillar) food source in order togain protection from predators through the chemicals they ingest from the plants they eat. Milkweedscontain cardiac glycosides, which are toxic to many species of birds and mammals. Plants have evolved these chemicals to protect themselves from being eaten, a strategy…

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