A writer inspired by nature and human nature

Posts tagged ‘spring’

Write a Spring Haiku & Get the Kids Writing Too!


Celebrating International Haiku Poetry Day!

As I wandered out into the garden with my trusty camera early this morning, much to my surprise, an icy blanket at the edge of the rock garden had melted and a family of opening jonquils greeted me with their smiles. Being the first blooms of the season, they simply made my day and inspired me to write “A Spring Concerto,”  a haiku (Japanese-inspired, non-rhyming three-line: 5-7-5 syllable poem).

A Spring Concerto
HAIKU by Bette A. Stevens

Jonquils awaken

Shaking their heads in wonder

A spring concerto

Personally, I love designing  posters to go with my poems and often use photos I have taken. As a former teacher (now retired) in grades four through eight, I know that kids of all ages love writing poetry and they enjoy illustrating their poems too. It’s simple and it’s so much fun to tell a story in the three short lines of Haiku. Of course, you can write as many stanzas as you wish. Today’s a perfect day for you to give it a try.

Get out your pen, get outdoors in nature, get inspired…and get the kids writing haiku too!

~Bette A. Stevens, Maine author/illustrator

(Haiku: m)

haiku

noun hai·ku \ˈhī-(ˌ)kü\

plural

haiku

  1. :  an unrhymed verse form of Japanese origin having three lines containing usually five, seven, and five syllables respectively; also :  a poem in this form usually having a seasonal reference — compare tanka

 

Discover more about how to write haiku and other poetry:

Find out more about International Haiku Poetry Day

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Hairy Woodpecker HAIKU by Bette A. Stevens


It’s National Poetry Month!
What’s inspiring you? ~Bette A. Stevens, Maine author http://www.4writersandreaders.com

Bette A. Stevens, Maine Author

NATIONAL POETRY MONTH

Hairy Woodpecker HAIKU

Inspired!

While sipping breakfast tea and finishing a journal entry, I glanced up at the window and spotted striking black and white flutters darting among the lilac branches. The first feathered friend was a downy woodpecker. By the time I grabbed the camera, he had disappeared and a nearly identical but larger version, a hairy woodpecker, hung upside down, pecking the last of winter’s crumbs from the suet cage. They’re sure to be back to dine, but next time it will be on succulent spring favorites—buds and bugs. Inspiring. Ah, spring! ~ Bette A. Stevens

What’s inspiring you?

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“Winter’s Last Hurrah” a poem by Bette A. Stevens


Winter's Last Hurrah POEM bas 2016 2Winter’s Last Hurrah
A poem of seasonal transition by Bette A. Stevens

First day of spring at the farmstead in Central Maine and more than migrating birds flutter about to entertain us. Snowflakes join the celebration. The flurry of Slate-colored Juncos and White-breasted Nuthatches (I managed to capture a snapshot of one at the feeder) don’t seem to mind at all.

Wonders of the seasons—they never cease to amaze us!

~ Bette A. Stevens, Maine author/illustrator

Find out more about birds mentioned in “Winter’s Last Hurrah”

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1034. Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are a part of mystery. ~Max Planck


The wonder of it all! ~ Bette A. Stevens

Sacred Touches


Nature looks dead in winter because her life is gathered into her heart. She withers the plant down to the root that she may grow it up again fairer and stronger. She calls her family together within her inmost home to prepare them for being scattered abroad upon the face of the earth. ~Hugh Macmillan

Screen Shot 2016-01-10 at 6.35.46 PM.png

When the ages of ice came
And sealed the Earth inside
An endless coma of cold,
The heart of the Earth held hope,
Storing fragments of memory,
Ready for the return of the sun.

Let us then salute the silence
And certainty of mountains:
Their sublime stillness,
Their dream-filled hearts.

The wonder of a garden
Trusting the first warmth of spring
Until its black infinity of cells
Becomes charged with dream;
Then the silent, slow nurture
Of the seed’s self, coaxing it
To trust the act of death.

The humility of the Earth
That transfigures…

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morning light…


Bask in the beauty! ~ Bette A. Stevens

SwittersB & Exploring

“The sun just touched the morning;
The morning, happy thing,
Supposed that he had come to dwell,
And life would be all spring.”

Emily Dickinson

pink rose-morning light-garden-SwittersB

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Sunbeam Melodies: HAIKU by Bette A. Stevens


Sunbeam composing HAIKU bas 2015

Spring Magic?

I was fortunate to capture spring’s magical beams composing melodies on our daffodils along the walkway to the Farmstead late last week. Naturally, I got inspired. Grabbed the Cannon, downloaded several images to my laptop and played around with photo editor. I’m a writer inspired by nature who loves to capture the moments and to create new images too. What’s inspiring you?

~ Bette A. Stevens, Maine author/illustrator

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Rainbow Promises, a HAIKU by Bette A. Stevens


Rainbow HAIKU bas 2015Spring has finally sprung after a long and frigid winter at here at The Farmstead in Central Maine. Captured a rainbow and its promise in a spring Haiku. Hope you’re enjoying the sensational sights, sounds and scents of the season, friends! ~ Bette A. Stevens

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